My print entry for the 20:20 Print Exchange 2019

In September this year I entered the 20:20 Print Exchange with nine other members of Cowprint, the printmakers group associated with the Red Hot Press. The exchange is run by the Hot Bed Press in Salford, UK and has been running annually since it was set up in 2009 with an exchange of prints between the Red Hot Press in Southampton and Hot Bed Press. The project has grown rapidly with this year a record 18,300 prints from 732 artists and 45 workshops and groups as far afield as Moscow, Hong Kong and Canada.

Each artist is asked to produce a new edition of 25 prints on paper sized 20 x 20 cm. In return each artist receives a box set of 20 randomly selected prints including one of their own.

My entry was this four plate wood cut of the Magnolia in our back garden. In late Autumn the leaves turn shades of golden yellow and orange and in the morning light it shines like a beacon against a darker backdrop of woodland. The tree overhangs the lawn and I often wonder what it would be like if the lawn was a large pond instead. We often get damsel flies in the garden so it seemed appropriate to include a couple hovering over the imaginary pond.

Earlier this month Cowprint members gathered together to receive our boxes – there’s a lot of anticipation as to what type of prints you might get and where they might come from I was very pleased with my box which included some really beautiful prints and such a wide variety of techniques and subject matter.

For more details of my print see Autumn Magnolia and you can see my collection of prints from the box set below:

‘Erosion’ selected for Southbank Printmakers Mini Print Open Exhibition 2019

Editioning

I saw this exhibition promoted on Instagram and thought I would give it a go and was thrilled to find out my wood engraving print ‘Erosion’ was selected. The exhibition opened on 1 May and runs until 2 June 2019 at the Southbank Printmakers Gallery, on the Southbank near the Thames (Gabriel’s Wharf), London. One of the prints was sold before the exhibition opened which made me think I ought to finish editioning the print pretty quickly.

I had been thinking about getting a platen press for a few months allowing me to print onto a heavier weight paper at home. I would love one of those beautiful antique Albion table top presses but they are very expensive and difficult to find so I looked on eBay for a cast iron copying press. I managed to find a bookbinder wanting to sell on a Waterlow and Sons, London Wall press at a reasonable price and picked it up last week. It is a rather odd lemon yellow colour over painted with black but, having given it a good clean, it seems to be in good working order and maybe one day I’ll strip it back and repaint it… one day!

My workstation set up in my studio

Having searched the web for any information on using a book press for printing I found a few threads on wetcanvas.com on how to set up a sliding board with a registration plate to make it easier to put the block under the press. I was really pleased with the results – getting better prints than using a galley press.

Registration plate located centrally under press

I used the small polypropylene board that came with my Xcut Xpress with a polycarbonate registration pate marked up with a cm grid on top.

I experimented with different pressures and found that a single sheet of newsprint with a layer of craft felt on top gave a good result. I used a few blocks of softwood and a card registration plate on top to aid placing the paper ready to print.

The press has short screw handles (some have large brass knobs on the end). This seems to be its original design – may be it was a work horse press so didn’t need to look ‘pretty’! I did try putting some extra pressure on with a cut off scaffolding pole but that seems to create too much pressure in the far left hand corner so it seems that I can put on enough pressure without it.

Editions done and hung up to dry

‘Erosion’ selected for St Barbe Open 2019

Im really excited today as St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery in Lymington have selected this wood engraving for their forth coming Open Exhibition which starts on 23 March and ends 2 June 2019. This is only my second wood engraving, completed on an introductory course at the Red Hot press, Southampton in January 2019 with tutor Jutta Manser. This is also my first entry into an open exhibition too! Cant wait for the exhibition!

For many years we have walked the coastal path along the edge of Hamble Common looking out on to Southampton Water and to the New Forest and Isle of Wight beyond. Each winter the storms batter the soft clay and shingle shore line and clumps of the grassy banks gradually fall into the water and are washed out to sea. This winter I joined Hamble Conservation Volunteers to do occasional beach cleans and was surprised to see how far the banks of the Common have been eroded. What was really fascinating was how the clumps of grass work their way down the beach with each successive tide, gradually being eroded and appearing like tufts of hair rising above the incoming tide. This wood engraving image tries to capture the scene looking back towards the shore, across the shingle beach, as the tide comes in to claim more of the grassy clumps.

After finishing the course I set about editioning the wood block which was much harder than I thought it would be; getting the press set at the right height/pressure and just the right amount of ink to avoid loosing the crisp lines of the engraving. After a bit of practice I got the hang of it and managed to get some decent editions done.

For more information on the print see https://kayabrown.co.uk/portfolio/erosion/ and for my first wood engraving ‘Koi Carp’ see https://kayabrown.co.uk/portfolio/koi-carp/