Printing a wood engraving with letterpress founts – my ‘LOVE is … Pink Ferry’ card

Following the success of my Pink Ferry linocut I thought that the Pink Ferry would also make a good subject for a wood engraving. I had also been thinking about designing a card for St Valentines Day using my newly acquired letterpress founts and seeing if I could successfully print both these and a wood engraving. I had tried this first with my Sea Fever card but had run out of time before Christmas to get consistently good prints and realised that the combination of printing pressure, make-ready packing and printing ink were not quite right.

I set about designing a simple silhouette of the ferry on tracing paper, transferring the image using red carbon paper onto a lemon wood block that had been dyed black with a light wash of Quink ink. I was a bit undecided how to depict the water so developed this as I proofed the block. I also decided to include a border to support the ink roller when inking up and to try avoid the cleared areas picking up any ink.

I then locked up the block with the typeface in a chase (called a forme) which I had already composed in 14 and 12 pt Perpetua, with spacing furniture and leadings. I then moved the chase to the moveable bed and checked all the typeface is flush with the bed by loosening the chase slightly and ‘planing’ the forme, using a flat block of wood (a planer) and a mallet or similar to gently tamp down the type before the chase is locked up tight. Initially, my proofs showed that the 14 pt ‘LOVE’ was out of line with the 12 pt ‘is …’ and needed a hairs width of spacing to lift the 12 pt up. I found that a small cut piece of Zerkall 215 gsm both above and below the 12 pt worked a treat!

I currently use an old cast iron Waterlow & Sons copying press to print my letterpress and wood engravings as a cheap alternative to a semi-automated press such as an Adana or Albion. I place the block or chase on a moveable bed made from a rigid flat board covered with a thin sheet of clear acrylic (marked up for registration) which I slide under the platen. You apply pressure by screwing down a platen and with a small block like this a hand tight pressure, with only two sheets of newsprint protecting the card to be printed, seems adequate. The platen seems to apply more pressure to the top left of the block and least pressure to the bottom right so the make-ready needs to be adjusted accordingly.

After quite a bit of trial and error I finally got the underlay and overlay of make-ready producing good prints. I used the blocks of wood as bearers to support the card, stuck down with tape.

I used a strip of newsprint over the card to improve the printing of the lower border. I also added a small square of newsprint over ‘share’ for the same reason.

I cut out a registration card for both the front and rear of the card (using my rubber stamp logo on the rear).

I’m very pleased with how this design and its printing has turned out but I suspect that if I had used a traditional letterpress ink instead of the Caligo Safe Wash Etching Inks I would have got better results still. Another lot of inks to purchase!

For more details see here – https://kayabrown.co.uk/portfolio/love-is-sharing-a-ride-on-the-pink-ferry/.

‘Erosion’ selected for St Barbe Open 2019

Im really excited today as St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery in Lymington have selected this wood engraving for their forth coming Open Exhibition which starts on 23 March and ends 2 June 2019. This is only my second wood engraving, completed on an introductory course at the Red Hot press, Southampton in January 2019 with tutor Jutta Manser. This is also my first entry into an open exhibition too! Cant wait for the exhibition!

For many years we have walked the coastal path along the edge of Hamble Common looking out on to Southampton Water and to the New Forest and Isle of Wight beyond. Each winter the storms batter the soft clay and shingle shore line and clumps of the grassy banks gradually fall into the water and are washed out to sea. This winter I joined Hamble Conservation Volunteers to do occasional beach cleans and was surprised to see how far the banks of the Common have been eroded. What was really fascinating was how the clumps of grass work their way down the beach with each successive tide, gradually being eroded and appearing like tufts of hair rising above the incoming tide. This wood engraving image tries to capture the scene looking back towards the shore, across the shingle beach, as the tide comes in to claim more of the grassy clumps.

After finishing the course I set about editioning the wood block which was much harder than I thought it would be; getting the press set at the right height/pressure and just the right amount of ink to avoid loosing the crisp lines of the engraving. After a bit of practice I got the hang of it and managed to get some decent editions done.

For more information on the print see https://kayabrown.co.uk/portfolio/erosion/ and for my first wood engraving ‘Koi Carp’ see https://kayabrown.co.uk/portfolio/koi-carp/